It has started.

So.. how does this work?

Do we write this in english or swedish?
I guess we’ll start with english, so most of you can understand what’s going on and not to alienate anyone (anyone that can read my crappy english that is).

The entrance fee has been payed, the team has been set and there was much joy.

Now the real work begins.

We need to figure out a plan on how to raise money for charities, we need to pick one charity of our own, we need to get some sponsors (this rally won’t be cheap) and most of all, we need to decide on a car to use.

Why are we doing this? And what is this?

Glad you asked.

The Mongol Rally is a car rally that begins in Europe and ends in Ulan Bator, Mongolia. The principal launch is from Goodwood Circuit, United Kingdom, with subsidiary starting points in other European countries, we’re starting from the Czech Republic.

It is described as the “greatest adventure in the world”. Whilst originally the rally required competing vehicles to have an engine displacement of less than 1,000cc, this has been increased to 1,200 cc to reflect the increasing difficulty of obtaining a car since the Mongolian government stipulated that all competing vehicles must be less than 10 years old.

The rally is designed to be an adventure for the participants, and not a traditional rally/race. The organisers (“The Adventurists“) are careful to point out that racing on highways is illegal, and that no recognition is given to the first finisher.

There are other differences from mainstream rallies, particularly the fact that no support team is provided and no other arrangements are made such as for accommodation. Indeed, the diminutive vehicles are deliberately inappropriate for the task, in the adventurous spirit of the rally.

When you arrive in Ulan Bator, your car is auctioned off, with all the raised money going to charity. So you’ll have to walk home (or take a flight, or something like that).

The The organisers warns against the risks of this kind of adventure. An undisclosed number of racers have been injured since 2004. In 2010 an adventurer was killed and two injured in an accident while crossing Iran.

So why are we doing this? Isn’t it obvious?!
We love charity, and we love adventure, so this rally is to good to pass up on.